FAQ

FAQ: What is a Tort?

Torts are civil violations that cause harm or loss. The individual or organization that commits or is responsible for these impacts may be held liable for the losses and damages caused. The intent of a tort is to compensate victims and to discourage similar behavior in the future. The responsible party does not face incarceration

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FAQ

FAQ: What is Vicarious Liability?

In a normal personal injury case, Person A engages in a negligent act and injures Person B. As a result, Person A is liable for the injuries. Vicarious Liability is a form of indirect liability that occurs when parties have a particular relationship or agency between them. The most common forms of Vicarious Liability are:

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FAQ

FAQ: What is an Unconscionable Act?

Most often used with the Texas Deceptive Trade Practices Act and limited to economic outcomes associated with commercial transactions, an Unconscionable Act is “an act of practice, which to a consumer’s detriment, takes advantage of the lack of knowledge, ability, or capacity of the consumer to a grossly unfair degree, resulting in a gross disparity

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FAQ

FAQ: What is Strict Liability?

Strict Liability occurs when a person engages in certain actions, and requires neither negligence, recklessness nor intent. The most common actions to incur Strict Liability include: Abnormally dangerous activities such involving things like explosives, chemical materials or radiation. Product defects where injury was reasonably foreseeable. Animal bites that occur beyond the One Bite Rule. To

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FAQ

FAQ: What is the Statute of Repose?

Under Texas law, a potential plaintiff has two years to file a lawsuit from the time an injury is discovered. This is the statute of limitations. A statute of repose limits the time to file a lawsuit based factors separate from when the injury occurred and/or was discovered. For instance, the statute of response for

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FAQ

FAQ: What are Special Damages?

Special Damages are one of two forms of compensatory damages in Texas personal injury cases. Special Damages compensate for out-of-pocket losses such as: Past and future medical expenses Loss of income, but current and future Repair or replacement of property Costs the plaintiff incurred attempting to mitigate their own liability Disability costs Funeral and burial

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FAQ

FAQ: What is Respondeat Superior?

Respondeat Superior applies liability to an employer for the actions of its employees in certain cases. Generally, the injury must have occurred “within the scope of employment”. Specifically, the plaintiff must prove that the employee’s actions were: Within the general authority granted by the employer, In furtherance of the employer’s business, and  For the accomplishment of

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FAQ

FAQ: What is Reasonable Care?

Reasonable Care is a duty held by both individuals and businesses, to provide reasonable care in their actions. Unreasonable actions that result in injury may be a cause for a negligence claims. In the case of an individual, Reasonable Care requires a driver to stop at a red light. If the driver runs the red

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FAQ

FAQ: What are Punitive Damages?

As opposed to  Compensatory Damages, which aim to make an injured party whole, Punitive Damages are intended to punish a defendant and serve as a deterrence to others. Such damages are not always awarded, but are most often granted in cases of gross negligence, extreme recklessness or malicious motives. In Texas, punitive damages are only

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FAQ

FAQ: What is Proximate Cause?

Texas courts break down causation into two types: actual and proximate. Generally a plaintiff must prove both types to win a case. Actual cause is fairly straightforward. Suppose the defendant is texting while driving, and rearends the plaintiff. The defendant’s actions are the actual cause of the accident.  Proximate cause is usually more complex, and

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